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ASA relaxes swimwear rules to encourage new competitors

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In an attempt to appeal to a wider proportion of the public, the Amateur Swimming Association (ASA) will now allow swimmers to compete with full-body bathing suits.

The body has relaxed Regulation 411, which previously banned swimwear that covered the whole body.

New guidance means that swimmers who wish to wear full bodysuits for religious beliefs of medical conditions can compete at ASA national events.

The move has been hailed by the Muslim Women’s Sport Foundation.

Rimla Akhtar, chair of the body, said she was “extremely pleased with the outcome”.

“Participation in sport among Muslim women is increasing at a rapid pace,” she added. “It is imperative that governing bodies adapt and tailor their offerings to suit the changing landscape of sport, including those who access sport.”

Chair of the ASA Sport Governing Board, Chris Bostock, said: “We want everyone to be able to reach their potential. Representing your club at a national swimming competition is very special.

“By changing these rules we hope to encourage a new generation of swimmers.”

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In an attempt to appeal to a wider proportion of the public, the Amateur Swimming Association (ASA) will now allow swimmers to compete with full-body bathing suits.
SAR
Competitors will now be allowed to wear full bodysuits for religious reasons